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Visiting UK after 3 months in Ireland

Email: Hi I have a friend from America who holidayed here in Ireland for three months and is now back in the US and is thinking of now holidaying in the North of Ireland and the UK in general, is it possible to travel again so soon after her last holiday? She is currently on sabbatical from her job. Great job as usual guys. N

Hi N.  A visitor to the United States must leave within three months if they don’t have a visa.  The reciprocal arrangements in Ireland are similar for a three-month period.

If you go to the United States the three-month rule applies to the entire US and not each state but in the EU it is on a state-by-state basis.

The United Kingdom have a longer period of six months, so it should be possible for your friend to visit without difficulty.

That said, it is very important to read the rules on UK visitors because you must be able to prove that you want to visit for no more than six months and that you intend to leave at the end of your visit.  You must also have money to support yourself without working or needing help from public funds and you do not intend, and will not take paid or unpaid employment. 

What is more important about this is that you have to be prepared to prove this on arrival in the UK or at any time during your visit.  That means you must show bank accounts, have a pre-booked address and ideally a return ticked to the United States.

What could happen is that on arrival in the UK, with a scan of the passport showing the entry and exit visas from Ireland, the immigration officer could take you aside and interview you asking you for all the proof necessary under the various headings that I have quoted.     It is also important to realise that immigration officers have absolute discretion and if you cannot prove any of the points or satisfactorily answer the questions, you could be deported.  This could even happen during your stay, if you were approached by a police officer on the street.

My advice to your friend, N, is to carefully read the information from the UK border agency on the link below and make sure that he/she fully complies with all the requirements

Remember that like the United States, the UK considers itself to be at war.  That means they take the security of their borders very seriously. 

http://www.ukvisas.gov.uk/en/howtoapply/infs/inf2visitors#21230918

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